CRRF - UNHCR

Labour market integration in Turkey

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Country or region: Turkey, Europe
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 3
Actors: Governments, United Nations agencies
CRRF Objectives: Objective 2

The Government of Turkey took significant steps for Syrians under Temporary Protection to be integrated into the labour market. In January 2016 “Work Permit Regulation” (for people under TP) was issued. Through this regulation, integration of Syrians to the formal workforce was accelerated. As a complement, several UN Agencies began to support the efforts of the GoT by their programmes aiming both supply and demand side of labour market through job placements, trainings, grants etc.

The Government of Turkey has also been playing an active role to promote higher education for Syrians under Temporary Protection. As a complement, UN Agencies began to implement similar programmes aiming Syrians in cooperation with respective state institutions and ministries.

Provision of healthcare services has always remained as a focus for the GoT. To facilitate the integration of Syrian healthcare workers to the Turkish system, respective UN Agencies worked in cooperation with the state institutions and ministries.

Emergency Social Safety Net (ESSN) programme

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Country or region: Turkey, Europe
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 2
Actors: Governments
CRRF Objectives: Objective 2

In Turkey, the EU-funded Emergency Social Safety Net (ESSN) programme, implemented by the Ministry of Family and Social Policy (MoFSP), the Turkish Red Crescent (TRC), and the World Food Programme (WFP), seeks to address basic needs of 1.3 million refugees across the country through the provision of multi-purpose unrestricted cash (MPC). In the ESSN’s design and implementation, several good practices can be observed including, but not limited to, the following:

1. Alignment of the programme with the Turkish welfare system and the leveraging of national capacities: The ESSN represents a hybrid social assistance scheme which, importantly, is anchored on and aligned with government systems and integrates crucial humanitarian safeguards. In designing the programme, it was recognized that addressing needs among off-camp refugees in Turkey would require major capacity and geographical reach; therefore, given their respective capability and their achievements in meeting the needs of Turkish citizens, it was agreed to leverage the government social welfare system and utilize TRC’s extensive capacity and networks to enable timely programme roll-out and scale-up. Accordingly, MoFSP and TRC have assumed the primary role in ESSN implementation, with WFP providing oversight, monitoring, and accountability, and reinforcing WFP and TRC capacity to deliver the programme in a responsible, transparent, and accountable manner. This approach has, simultaneously, helped to ensure value for money and sustainability.

2. Establishment of a Joint Management Cell to optimize coordination between WFP, TRC, and other stakeholders: In an unprecedented approach, a Joint WFP-TRC Management Cell (WFP-TRC JMC) has been set up to optimise collaboration in the management of the ESSN programme and foster the exchange of knowledge between the partners. WFP and TRC staff, fulfilling JMC functions in accordance with their respective roles and capacities, are now co-located in mixed agency thematic teams at the same premises in the Turkish capital, Ankara. To expedite troubleshooting and decision-making on issues identified during the ESSN’s implementation, representatives of MoFSP and the Directorate General of Migration Management (DGMM) are also invited to take part in weekly JMC meetings on an as-needed basis.

Social assistance in Turkey

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Country or region: Turkey, Europe
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 2
Actors: Governments
CRRF Objectives: Objective 2

The Government of Turkey (GoT) has provided social assistance (cash and in kind) in various sectors. The coverage of health services at all stages for Syrians under Temporary Protection and for the persons having registered as international protection applicants contributes to dignified and adequate standards of living for refugee communities living in Turkey. As an extension to those programmes, several programmes covering Syrians under Temporary Protection began to be implemented under the coordination of relevant state institutions. Moreover, in terms of infrastructure development, both the central and local administrations have worked to develop the infrastructure, especially where the refugee population is dense.

Turkey’s reception and admission processes

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Country or region: Turkey
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 1
Actors: Governments
CRRF Objectives: Objective 1, Objective 2

The Directorate General of Migration Management (DGMM), established in April 2013 under the Ministry of Interior, is entrusted to coordinate the overall registration processes of Syrian refugees, identify people in need and provide safe reception conditions in line with the Temporray Protection Regulation (TPR). The Regulation adopted a rights-based approach enabling access to services, including health, education and labour market aiming to offer Syrian refugees adequate coverage in terms of basic services. UN Agencies contributed to this process in a holistic manner by supporting the responsible institutions in terms of capacity development, sharing of experiences and provision of necessary equipment.

Turkey has demonstrated strong national leadership and ownership since the beginning of the crisis. The national asylum law was endorsed and secondary legislation developed in the past years to strengthen the national asylum regime and define roles and responsibilities of state institutions in the protection of and assistance to refugees.

The Law on Foreigners and International Protection has provisions regulating that foreigners cannot be detained due to their asylum application while asylum applicants can only be detained on the exceptional grounds regulated in the Law. Alternatives to detention shall be prioritised in consideration of any measures concerning the individual applicant.
To support state institutions in service provision to persons of concern, the UN significantly scaled up its support to ministries and local authorities in the past years. One example is the support the Social Service Centres (SSC) under the Ministry of Family and Social Policies, which is tasked to conduct outreach and provide counselling and social assistance to vulnerable Turkish and refugee families. The support provided includes deployment of staff (social workers, counsellors, interprets), equipment and vehicles.

Asylum applicants, status holders, and TP beneficiaries can benefit from the legal aid mechanisms like any citizens in the country. They are in most of the cases exempt from the procedures (such as submission of documentation on their financial means) which the citizens are expected to fulfil.

Joint UNHCR-UNDP Programming on the DRC Situation

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Country or region: Africa, Democratic Republic of the Congo
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 5
Actors:
CRRF Objectives: Objective 1, Objective 4

The first UNHCR – UNDP Joint-Programming Workshop on the Refugee Response Plan to the DRC Situation was held on 02-03 July, at the United Nations Office in Nairobi. The workshop was organized by the Offices of UNHCR Regional Refugee Coordinator for the DRC Situation, Ann Encontre, and UNDP Sub Regional Platform Coordinator, David Clapp, and follows the UNHCR High Commissioner’s and UNDP Administrator’s message of 30 October 2017 on strengthening collaboration. The level of attendees, the degree of engagement, and the concrete results of the workshop demonstrate the eagerness of both agencies to put the global agreement into action in the sub-region.
The 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda and the principle of “Leaving No One Behind”, as well as the Global Compact on Refugees and its Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework (CRRF) approach, provided an important framework for this collaboration.

The main objective of the workshop was to identify and start developing joint humanitarian, development and peace programming in the 5 thematic areas to be reflected in the 2019 Regional Refugee Response Plan (RRRP) for the DRC situation. The agencies started to agree on work plans and explored the concrete mechanisms and structures needed to overcome roadblocks to joint implementation. They also started to outline resource needs, including technical support requirements from HQ and regional service centres.

Please click here for more information. 

 

Supporting Ethiopia’s refugee response

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Country or region: Africa, Ethiopia
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 5
Actors: Development actors, Governments, United Nations agencies
CRRF Objectives: Objective 1, Objective 2

The German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) supports Ethiopia in its refugee response. Ethiopia is the second largest host country of refugees in Africa, hosting refugees from South Sudan, Eritrea and Somalia. As one of the CRRF roll-out countries Ethiopia has committed to nine reforms, among which one aims at increasing the enrolment rates of refugees in primary, secondary and tertiary education and another one at the enhancement of the provision of basic social services. German support focuses specifically on these pledges.

German development cooperation supports three of the main regions in Ethiopia hosting refugees (Gambella, Tigray, Somali region) as well as urban refugees in Addis Ababa. Based on the extensive experience in supporting Ethiopia’s education sector, German development cooperation also supports the Ethiopian Federal Ministry of Education regarding the government’s recent pledges to more strongly promote refugees’ education. In addition, a staff secondment to the National CRRF Coordination Unit is foreseen, to further strengthen the national capacities in implementing the CRRF pledges.

BMZ’ integrative approach in supporting Ethiopia in its reforms, which is especially challenging given the context of a strict encampment policy, is replicable in other contexts as well. BMZ and the implementing partners KfW and GIZ apply this conflict-sensitive, integrative approach and measures to the local context and still fully comply to the Ethiopian legal and policy framework.

By strengthening state actors and local communities as well as refugees, the resilience of displaced and host communities is increased and employment perspectives are improved.

Please find a comprehensive overview of the support to Ethiopia’s refugee response provided by Germany’s development cooperation here.

Making use of the skills and talents of newcomers in Germany

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Country or region: Germany
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 3
Actors: Academia
CRRF Objectives: Objective 1, Objective 2

A ground-breaking programme makes use of the skills and talents of newcomers. The pilot scheme is aimed at preparing newly arrived teachers for jobs in German schools. The Refugee Teachers Programme, based at Potsdam University, is designed to help newcomers learn the ropes of the German education system and have them teaching again within just 18 months.

 

Read the full article here.

Working Together for Local Integration of Migrants and Refugees

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Country or region: Europe
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 3
Actors: Governments, Local goverments
CRRF Objectives: Objective 1, Objective 2

Behind every migration statistic, there are individuals or families starting a new life in a new place. Local authorities, in co-ordination with all levels of government and other local partners, play a key role in integrating these newcomers and empowering them to contribute to their new communities. Integration needs to happen where people are: in their workplaces, their neighbourhoods, the schools to which they send their children and the public spaces where they will spend their free time.

The OECD released a report that describes what it takes to formulate a place-based approach to integration through concerted efforts across levels of government as well as between state and non-state actors. It draws on both quantitative evidence, from a statistical database, and qualitative evidence from a survey of 72 cities. These include nine large European cities (Amsterdam, Athens, Barcelona, Berlin, Glasgow, Gothenburg, Paris, Rome and Vienna) and one small city in Germany (Altena), which are the subject of in-depth case studies. The report also presents a 12-point checklist, a tool that any city or region – in Europe, the OECD or beyond – can use to work across levels of government and with other local actors in their efforts to promote more effective integration of migrants.

The full report can be found here.

 

Regional Refugee & Resilience Plan (3RP)

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Country or region: Middle East and North Africa (MENA)
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 5
Actors: Governments, United Nations agencies
CRRF Objectives: Objective 1, Objective 2

The 3RP: a regionally coherent, country-driven response to the Syria crisis

The Regional Refugee & Resilience Plan (3RP) responds to the humanitarian, protection and assistance needs of refugees from Syria and other impacted persons, communities and institutions in the five hosting countries of Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Iraq and Egypt.

  • A global first in terms of response to crisis
  • Country-driven processes are paramount and national plans anchor the response;
  • Increasing effectiveness, cost-efficiency of interventions and greater accountability: producing a single planning, coordination, monitoring and evaluation framework at regional level, expanding on the successful “Refugee Response Plan – RRP” model
  • Integrating refugees and host communities into a single model. Two components in a single plan: refugee component and resilience component.

Refugee protection and humanitarian assistance component (the Refugee Component): Addresses the protection and assistance needs of refugees living in camps, settlements and local communities in all sectors, as well as vulnerable members of impacted communities. It strengthens community-based protection by identifying and responding to immediate support needs of communal services in impacted communities.

Resilience Component: Assists impacted communities to cope with and recover from the refugee crisis in all sectors. It builds the capacities of households, communities and national systems that have been impacted by the crisis, and provides the strategic, technical, and policy support to advance national responses.

The synergies and degree of integration between the two components may vary from country to country. Factors influencing this include the impact of the crisis at national and community levels and the priorities of national planning processes.

 

Please click here to open the 3RP Regional Strategic Overview.

African Youth Action Network’s (AYAN) for peaceful coexistence

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Country or region: Uganda
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 3
Actors: Persons of concern, Refugee-led organizations, Host communities
CRRF Objectives: Objective 1, Objective 2, Objective 4

The refugee-led organization African Youth Action Network (AYAN) was founded in June 2015 in Uganda by young South Sudanese refugees and is currently registered in South Sudan and Uganda.

AYAN was supported by UNHCR in 2016 and 2017 through the Youth Initiative Fund (YIF) to train young refugees and host community youth in peace building and conflict resolution focusing on emotional intelligence and self-awareness in Uganda. At AYAN, we believe that the youth is well positioned to organize and participate in promoting a movement of sustainable peace through positive, non-violent, community-building activities, training, mentorship and community outreach programmes in the Great Lakes Region and other volatile parts of Africa. AYAN has furthermore reached out to adolescents and young people below the age of 35 in refugee settlements and urban centres to address the consequences of conflict and violence experienced by youth in the Great Lakes including stress and psychosocial trauma.

AYAN has helped in identifying young refugee students from poor families who could not afford secondary education to be enrolled under the Windle Trust Education Scheme in 2016 with support from the UNHCR country Office in Uganda as AYAN’s members believe that illiteracy is one of the major causes of conflict in South Sudan.

The organization engages in dialogues with community leaders, youth, and church leaders to settle dispute in the refugee hosting areas and help communities that have experienced the conflict in South Sudan to work together with a view to empower each other, enhance our self-reliance and equip us to contribute to creating conditions conducive to return and recovery.

Furthermore contributing to enhance refugees’ self-reliance, AYAN members train young refugee youth in making shoes and editing videos, enabling them to make a living in the refugee settlement through selling the sandals, other shoes and editing videos for other people in the communities.

AYAN’s vision is to live in peace, offering youth opportunities to participate in peace-building processes and empower each other, contribute to the socio-economic development of their community and to engage in activities around them.

For more information, please contact info@ayanafrica.org and see the website: http://www.ayanafrica.org/  


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