CRRF - UNHCR

Working Together for Local Integration of Migrants and Refugees

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Country or region: Europe
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 3
Actors: Governments, Local goverments
CRRF Objectives: Objective 1, Objective 2

Behind every migration statistic, there are individuals or families starting a new life in a new place. Local authorities, in co-ordination with all levels of government and other local partners, play a key role in integrating these newcomers and empowering them to contribute to their new communities. Integration needs to happen where people are: in their workplaces, their neighbourhoods, the schools to which they send their children and the public spaces where they will spend their free time.

The OECD released a report that describes what it takes to formulate a place-based approach to integration through concerted efforts across levels of government as well as between state and non-state actors. It draws on both quantitative evidence, from a statistical database, and qualitative evidence from a survey of 72 cities. These include nine large European cities (Amsterdam, Athens, Barcelona, Berlin, Glasgow, Gothenburg, Paris, Rome and Vienna) and one small city in Germany (Altena), which are the subject of in-depth case studies. The report also presents a 12-point checklist, a tool that any city or region – in Europe, the OECD or beyond – can use to work across levels of government and with other local actors in their efforts to promote more effective integration of migrants.

The full report can be found here.

 

Regional Refugee & Resilience Plan (3RP)

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Country or region: Middle East and North Africa (MENA)
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 5
Actors: Governments, United Nations agencies
CRRF Objectives: Objective 1, Objective 2

The 3RP: a regionally coherent, country-driven response to the Syria crisis

The Regional Refugee & Resilience Plan (3RP) responds to the humanitarian, protection and assistance needs of refugees from Syria and other impacted persons, communities and institutions in the five hosting countries of Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Iraq and Egypt.

  • A global first in terms of response to crisis
  • Country-driven processes are paramount and national plans anchor the response;
  • Increasing effectiveness, cost-efficiency of interventions and greater accountability: producing a single planning, coordination, monitoring and evaluation framework at regional level, expanding on the successful “Refugee Response Plan – RRP” model
  • Integrating refugees and host communities into a single model. Two components in a single plan: refugee component and resilience component.

Refugee protection and humanitarian assistance component (the Refugee Component): Addresses the protection and assistance needs of refugees living in camps, settlements and local communities in all sectors, as well as vulnerable members of impacted communities. It strengthens community-based protection by identifying and responding to immediate support needs of communal services in impacted communities.

Resilience Component: Assists impacted communities to cope with and recover from the refugee crisis in all sectors. It builds the capacities of households, communities and national systems that have been impacted by the crisis, and provides the strategic, technical, and policy support to advance national responses.

The synergies and degree of integration between the two components may vary from country to country. Factors influencing this include the impact of the crisis at national and community levels and the priorities of national planning processes.

 

Please click here to open the 3RP Regional Strategic Overview.

African Youth Action Network’s (AYAN) for peaceful coexistence

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Country or region: Uganda
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 3
Actors: Persons of concern, Refugee-led organizations, Host communities
CRRF Objectives: Objective 1, Objective 2, Objective 4

The refugee-led organization African Youth Action Network (AYAN) was founded in June 2015 in Uganda by young South Sudanese refugees and is currently registered in South Sudan and Uganda.

AYAN was supported by UNHCR in 2016 and 2017 through the Youth Initiative Fund (YIF) to train young refugees and host community youth in peace building and conflict resolution focusing on emotional intelligence and self-awareness in Uganda. At AYAN, we believe that the youth is well positioned to organize and participate in promoting a movement of sustainable peace through positive, non-violent, community-building activities, training, mentorship and community outreach programmes in the Great Lakes Region and other volatile parts of Africa. AYAN has furthermore reached out to adolescents and young people below the age of 35 in refugee settlements and urban centres to address the consequences of conflict and violence experienced by youth in the Great Lakes including stress and psychosocial trauma.

AYAN has helped in identifying young refugee students from poor families who could not afford secondary education to be enrolled under the Windle Trust Education Scheme in 2016 with support from the UNHCR country Office in Uganda as AYAN’s members believe that illiteracy is one of the major causes of conflict in South Sudan.

The organization engages in dialogues with community leaders, youth, and church leaders to settle dispute in the refugee hosting areas and help communities that have experienced the conflict in South Sudan to work together with a view to empower each other, enhance our self-reliance and equip us to contribute to creating conditions conducive to return and recovery.

Furthermore contributing to enhance refugees’ self-reliance, AYAN members train young refugee youth in making shoes and editing videos, enabling them to make a living in the refugee settlement through selling the sandals, other shoes and editing videos for other people in the communities.

AYAN’s vision is to live in peace, offering youth opportunities to participate in peace-building processes and empower each other, contribute to the socio-economic development of their community and to engage in activities around them.

For more information, please contact info@ayanafrica.org and see the website: http://www.ayanafrica.org/  

Coursera for Refugees

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Country or region: Global
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 3
Actors: Private sector
CRRF Objectives: Objective 2

Coursera provides universal access to education, partnering with top universities and organizations to offer courses online. Coursera for Refugees was launched in 2016 when a handful of Coursera employees approached the U.S. Department of State with the idea to provide access to Coursera’s full catalog at no cost to refugees around the world. By mid 2018, Coursera has served over 11,000 refugee learners.

For more information, please visit refugees.coursera.org/

 

Multi-stakeholder emergency response in Nchelenge, Zambia

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Country or region: Africa, Zambia
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 5
Actors: Host communities, Local goverments, Non-governmental organizations, Governments, Development actors, Persons of concern, United Nations agencies
CRRF Objectives: Objective 1, Objective 2

In order to respond to the DRC refugee emergency in the north of Zambia, UNHCR and its government counterpart, the Office of the Commissioner for Refugees (COR) under the Ministry of Home Affairs have led a multi-stakeholder response since the emergency began in September 2017. Ensuring a conducive asylum space, COR has led the biometric registration of all Congolese refugees entering through Zambia’s Luapula Province and providing legal documentation.

Partners involved in the response who are working hand in hand with district authorities to ensure that the response is in line with local development priorities are over six UN Agencies, multiple NGOs, six line ministries, refugees and host communities. In order to accommodate the over 15,000 Congolese refugees in Nchelenge, the Government decided to follow a settlement approach, in which refugees are being settled in a village setting together with some 5,000 Zambian host community members. This approach has allowed infrastructure development and service delivery such as health, education and WASH to be of equal access to both population groups, facilitating social cohesion and peaceful co-existence from the onset. In April 2018, over 80% of those receiving health services in Mantapala Refugee Settlement were Zambians.

As the number of new arrivals decreases and the situation becomes stable, UNHCR and COR are pro-actively seeking new partnerships that will bring early development to Mantapala. This includes involving development partners such as UNDP and FAO, as well seeking to establish private sector investment in the areas of energy, mobility and connectivity.

Collaboration with Programa Casa Refugiados (PCR)

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Country or region: Mexico, Americas
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 3
Actors: Non-governmental organizations, Academia, Private sector, Governments
CRRF Objectives: Objective 1, Objective 2

In Mexico City, UNHCR works through the implementing partner Programa Casa Refugiados (PCR) to support the integration of asylum-seekers and refugees, including through linkages to existing capacity-building and employment opportunities, among other services. PCR along with the American Institute for Educational Development (IADE) Foundation, started the network “Abriendo Puertas” (“Opening Doors”) to promote peaceful coexistence and human development through decent employment. To date, the network “Abriendo Puertas” is supported by several private sector companies. In 2017, as a result of collaboration between UNHCR and ILO, several public programmes such as Trabajo Digno (“Decent Work”), Mi primer empleo (“My first job”), and unemployment insurance modified their eligibility criteria in order to ensure the inclusion of refugees and asylum-seekers as beneficiaries. The Ministry of Labor is working in collaboration with PCR on providing access to various capacity-building, and economic and social development efforts for persons of concern. In August 2017, the Head of Government of Mexico City and the High Commissioner signed an agreement based on which persons of concern were included in 10 public programmes at the Mexico City level. Of note, 23 per cent of all the persons of concern reside in Mexico City.

UNHCR Mexico has worked with the municipal government, schools, and private sectors employers in Saltillo, Coahuila State, to implement the integration program for refugees in this city of solidarity. UNHCR is currently up-scaling its local integration programme in Saltillo aiming at relocating up to 500 refugees in 2018.

Since August 2016 to date, 227 refugees have benefited through the program (more than half in 2018), which provides relocation support, one-off integration cash grant for the first month, job placement in the first week of arrival and enrollment of refugee children in local schools. All participants have been employed in the formal sector, have opened bank accounts, and have access to formal health insurance. In May 2018, UNHCR relocated the first group of 10 refugees to Guadalajara.

City of Solidarity in Mexico

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Country or region: Mexico, Americas
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 3
Actors: Private sector, Governments, Local goverments
CRRF Objectives: Objective 1, Objective 2

In the Southern border states of Mexico, where most asylum-seekers arrive, opportunities for socio-economic integration are very limited. As a result of baselines studies conducted by UNHCR in cooperation with ILO and the Government of Mexico, UNHCR decided to relocate refugees from the Southern border states of Chiapas and Tabasco to areas where local integration opportunities were identified in Mexico City, Guadalajara (Jalisco State) and Saltillo (Coahuila State).

RST Programme – Emerging Resettlement Country Mechanism

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Country or region: Chile, Americas
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 4
Actors: Governments, Persons of concern
CRRF Objectives: Objective 3

Chile is one of the first three countries (with Argentina and Brazil) to apply the Emerging Resettlement Country Mechanism (ERCM) to design and implement their sponsorship, resettlement and complementary pathway models. In May 2017, Representatives from the three countries attended a capacity-building visit to Ottawa, organised by the Global Resettlement Sponsorship Initiative (GRSI), which was launched in 2016 with a view to develop practical guidance and tools to assist countries in setting up private sponsorship programmes.

Livelihoods in Chile

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Country or region: Chile, Americas
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 3
Actors: Governments
CRRF Objectives: Objective 1, Objective 2

In Chile, the socio-economic assessment has been developed jointly with all key actors involved on livelihoods issues. Regular meetings were held with the research and operational sections of the Department of Social Action (DAS) and the Department of Alien Status and Immigration (DEM), both from the Ministry of the Interior, the university leading the study, the implementing partner and UNHCR to develop the study, validate results and ensure the report responds to all relevant questions.

The government was hesitant about the development of a livelihoods strategy as it already provides funding for humanitarian assistance and income generation for Persons of Concern (PoC) However, through the joint development and review of the study, together with training on livelihoods issues by UNHCR, it was possible to shift their opinion and increase their engagement in operational issues for livelihoods programming. This is crucial as it allows to jointly advocate for the inclusion of PoC in social protection and employment promotion programmes and services and address key challenges regarding the socio-economic inclusion of PoC.

Protection Transit Arrangement (PTA)

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Country or region: Uruguay, Americas
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 4
Actors: Governments, Persons of concern
CRRF Objectives: Objective 3

Following the guiding principles of the Brazil Declaration and Plan of Action, and as an initiative to support regional efforts to create alternatives in response to the increased protection needs in the NCA Uruguay has resettled 16 Central American refugees (4 families) on November 2017.


  • European Commission
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  • German Humanitarian Assistance