CRRF - UNHCR

Education Can’t Wait – inclusion of refugees in Ethiopia – Swedish International Development Cooperation

  • Link
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Country or region: Ethiopia
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 3
Actors: Development actors, Host communities, Persons of concern, United Nations agencies, International organizations
CRRF Objectives: Objective 1, Objective 2

SIDA is funding Education Can’t Wait Fund with SEK 270 000 000 for 2018-2020. The aim of the fund is to prioritise safe, free and quality education by 2030 in crisis affected countries, while encouraging in-country governmental and non-governmental education actors to join forces to develop and implement contextualised, holistic and sustainable education programmes. The fund will include refugee children, along non-refugee children as beneficiaries.

World Bank Multi Donor Trust Fund inclusion of IDPs and returnees in Afghanistan (Swedish International Development Cooperation)

  • Link
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Country or region: Afghanistan, Pakistan
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 4
Actors: Governments, World Bank, Development actors, Persons of concern
CRRF Objectives: Objective 1, Objective 4

In Afghanistan, Sida funds the World Bank multi-donor trust fund (ARTF), Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund. The last few years, the World Bank together with the Afghan Government has adapted some of the projects financed via the ARTF to meet the situation of million returnees from Pakistan and Iran, and the growing number of conflict displaced IDPs. The work is done with a whole of community approach to reduce tensions and risks of conflicts between host communities and returnees/IDPs. For instance, the scope of a community-based development program was expanded, a cash-for-work program was set up to ensure livelihood opportunities for poor returnees/IDPs as well as host communities, and a new program to strengthen economic opportunities in urban areas with many returnees/IDPs is under development. Moreover, a budget priority of the ARTF concerns a cabinet decision that enables returnee/IDP ownership of informally occupied government-owned land.

Inclusion of Afghan returnees and IDPs in education and health services (Swedish International Development Cooperation)

  • Link
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Country or region: Afghanistan
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 4
Actors: Development actors, Governments, Persons of concern
CRRF Objectives: Objective 4

In response to the continuous humanitarian challenge, Sida’s partner Swedish Committee for Afghanistan (SCA) expanded its already existing activities in eastern Afghanistan. Additional Community Based Education classes have been established, with a focus on integrating returnee children into the Afghan educational system. Healthcare services have been expanded and its catchment area extended by implementation of mobile health teams/clinics. WASH activities have been amped up to provide safe drinking water and sanitary facilities for the growing population while at the same time reducing the risk for spread of diseases. To couple this expansion of already existing activities, SCA introduced psycho-social support and re-focused right awareness campaigns targeting returnees and IDPs.

 

Multi-year education programme for Afghan returnees and IDPs (Swedish International Development Cooperation)

  • Link
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Country or region: Afghanistan
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 4
Actors: Governments, Development actors, Persons of concern
CRRF Objectives: Objective 2, Objective 4

Sida is at present exploring different possibilities for increased support to Education in Emergencies focusing on education for girls and boys who are displaced by conflict or natural disasters as well as those who are returning from the places they had fled to within or beyond Afghanistan’s borders, in particular Pakistan. For displaced children, the issue is usually ensuring quality education in the mainstream for children rather than separate emergency provision.

Sida will therefore be financing a joint multi-year programme that will target the most vulnerable displaced populations in Afghanistan, with a particular focus on girls and IDP and returnee refugee communities in eighteen of the most vulnerable provinces during the first phase. The programme will target 500,000 children annually (325,000 girls; 175,000 boys) through community based education, accelerated learning classes and other innovative approaches.

Special resilience efforts to prevent recurrent humanitarian crises in the Horn of Africa

  • Link
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Country or region: Ethiopia, Somali Situation, Uganda, Kenya
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 2
Actors: Development actors, Governments
CRRF Objectives: Objective 1

Sida is allocating 800 MSEK (79 million USD) during 2018-2021 to strengthening resilience against climate change and natural disasters and reducing humanitarian needs in the Horn of Africa by addressing root causes of crises. A number of priorities have been developed for the funding, including: a) Help to address the underlying crisis and vulnerability causes, support sustainable solutions for those forcibly displaced, in order to reduce aid dependency. b) Reach the poorest, the most vulnerable affected by drought, refugees and internally displaced persons, and to support sustainable solutions for them. Areas of support include social protection, natural resources, livelihoods, food security, capacity to prevent and deal with crises. The special effort covers both regional and bilateral support in Ethiopia, Somalia, Uganda and Kenya.

Operationalizing the humanitarian-development nexus: the Swedish International Development Cooperation’s approach

  • Link
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Country or region: Global
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 3
Actors: Development actors, Host communities, Persons of concern, Governments
CRRF Objectives: Objective 1

Sida has worked actively during the last years to strengthen synergies between humanitarian and development support, including peace-building, in order to enhance resilience of crises-affected and vulnerable people, communities and societies. Humanitarian support and development cooperation need to be coherent and mutually reinforcing, while respecting and safeguarding humanitarian principles. In 171 contexts, Sida has simultaneously large ongoing development cooperation and humanitarian support with different mandates and roles presenting substantive opportunities for synergies and complementarity. In these contexts, Sida works to meet people’s immediate humanitarian needs, but over time also to reduce risk, vulnerability, and dependence on humanitarian assistance.

Sida has identified a 3 pillar-approach to systematize the work on risk, resilience and strengthened synergies between humanitarian and development assistance (Nexus HUM/DEV):

1) conduct common analysis, planning and programming based on context specific risks and vulnerabilities;
2) increase flexible, innovative and complementary development funding for the most vulnerable people; and
3) promote increased dialogue and coordination on risk, resilience and synergies between humanitarian and development.

Pillar 1: Common analysis, planning and programming based on risk, vulnerability and resilience

Common analysis, based on risk and vulnerability, is an important point of departure for strengthening synergies between humanitarian and development efforts. For example, Sida has included issues around humanitarian – development nexus in the yearly humanitarian crises analysis. Sida has also strengthened risk-informed development planning and programming through piloting together with OECD/DAC the method of resilience systems analysis (RSA) in six contexts at various points of the programme cycle (Syria, incl. Jordan and Lebanon, Sudan, South Sudan, Somalia, Kenya and Ethiopia.). In addition to supporting risk informed context analysis, experiences with the RSA3 has among others raised issues regarding humanitarian and development synergies and the need to include the most vulnerable groups in development assistance.

Pillar 2: Flexible, innovative and effective development funding for the most vulnerable people

According to the specific opportunities in each context, Sida works to strengthen resilience, focus on the underlying causes of crises and vulnerability and adapt to changing circumstances in a flexible and innovative way. Opportunities are explored to build on and complement humanitarian efforts in a transformative approach.

For example, in DRC and Uganda, Sida supports UNICEF with development funding to strengthen health systems in crises affected areas aimed at providing vulnerable populations with affordable access to functioning primary and secondary health care – key for reducing the populations exposure to epidemics and illness. The support includes management of malnutrition, a major hindrance to education and socioeconomic development. Furthermore, in crises affected areas in Mali and DRC, Sida supports community-based efforts with Action Contre la Faim (ACF) to address underlying causes of malnutrition crises such as access to safe drinking water, gender inequities, insufficient livelihoods.

Pillar 3: Promote increased dialogue and coordination on risk, resilience and synergies between humanitarian and development.

To be a driving force for strengthened dialogue and coordination is important, for example in donor groups, sector working groups and humanitarian clusters. Common planning and prioritization between humanitarian and development assistance could be promoted. Sida sees both the New Way of Working as well as the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework as great opportunities. Links between coordination structures are key, for example the inclusion of the most vulnerable people and communities in UN Development Strategies (UNDAFs) and national strategies. Multiyear humanitarian strategies that connects with UNDAF such as the one in Sudan.

Sweden is a strong supporter of the implementation of the Sendai framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, aiming at reducing peoples’ vulnerability to disasters and natural hazards through for example UNISDR. Sida’s global support to disaster risk reduction has during the past two years been successfully scaled up with development funding under Sida’s work with environment and climate on a global as well as on a regional and bilateral level.

More information can be found in the attached file.

Good Humanitarian Donor-ship: the Swedish International Development Cooperation’s (SIDA) approach to the CRRF

  • Link
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Country or region: Global
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 3
Actors: Development actors, Governments
CRRF Objectives: Objective 1

The NY Declaration and its annex 1 has highlighted the importance of inclusion of refugees and the need to strengthen synergies between Humanitarian Aid and Development Cooperation. Sida’s approach naturally facilitates inclusion of refugees and their host communities, as they often are part of the most vulnerable and poorest individuals and groups in society. At present several Sida bilateral and thematic Development Cooperation strategies already include refugees and their host communities in analysis and planning.

In line with its commitment to ‘Good Donorship’ and Sweden’s commitment to the Grand Bargain principles, partnership and aid effectiveness, Sida’s financial contributions to a large extent include core-, sector- or programme based support to its cooperation partners. This makes it more difficult to pinpoint exactly how Sida funding contributes to specific initiatives or groups in the population.

Sida’s approach aims to ensure building national and local structures and capacity to meet the needs of those most vulnerable or the poorest, including refugees and their host communities. For example, rather than supporting a specific ‘refugee project’ Sida Development Cooperation, in line with the global compact on refugees’ Plan of Action, opts to explore opportunities to include refugees in regional/local development plans, and support implementation of these plans. Such an approach demands time, effort and financial contributions, but if successful is sustainable and – clearly contributes solutions for refugees and their host countries.

More information can be found in the attached file.

Verification of the Personal Data of Syrian Nationals

  • Link
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Country or region: Turkey, Europe
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 1
Actors: Governments, United Nations agencies, Persons of concern
CRRF Objectives: Objective 1

In 2017, the verification exercise was launched in coordination with UNHCR to update identification information (on GöçNet database) of Syrians who started to come to Turkey in April 2011, sort out duplicate registrations, update address and contact information and identify family ties. It is aimed with the data verification exercise to ensure that the most up-to-date data of Syrians in Turkey is available in the records, use the most accurate data in public planning and ensure smooth service delivery in line with these data. In addition, new, secure identification cards are issued to Syrians whose identification information has been updated on the system. Another important aspect of the data verification exercise is that it helps to identify vulnerable Syrians and refer them to public institutions and organisations. Furthermore, persons of concern identified at protection desks that are also a part of the verification exercise are also prioritised in resettlement procedures. Up until now, personal data of 2,594,680 Syrians have been verified within the scope of the exercise.

Overcoming language barriers

  • Link
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Country or region: Turkey, Europe
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 2
Actors: Governments, United Nations agencies
CRRF Objectives: Objective 2

One of the most serious problems encountered regarding foreigners under international protection and temporary protection in Turkey hosting the highest number of refugees in the world is language barrier. The need for interpreters came into prominence as one of the most important requirements when Provincial Directorates of Migration Management (PDMMs) became operational as of 18 May 2015. All procedures such as registration and interview procedures regarding foreigners, change of province of residence, issuance of travel permit, certificate of legal capacity to marry, etc. are conducted through interpreters.

The cooperation with UNHCR in meeting the need for interpreters which is the most important factor in provision of services by Provincial Directorates of Migration Management made significant contribution to overcoming the language barrier. Specifically, the provision of interpreters to the provinces highly populated by Syrians has increased the speed and quality of services. As of July 2018, a total of 228 interpreters, most of whom are Arabic and Farsi interpreters, have supported our activities and tasks at PDMMs and played a central role in the strengthening of the organisation.

Durable Solutions in Turkey

  • Link
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Country or region: Turkey, Europe
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 4
Actors: Governments, United Nations agencies
CRRF Objectives: Objective 3

After it became operational in 2014, the Government’s Directorate General of Migration Management (DGMM) began to play an active role in resettlement procedures through the referral pathways. As a result of the EU-Turkey Statement, resettlement quotas have increased rapidly which led the DGMM’s capacity to develop accordingly. Both in terms of registration and resettlement procedures, DGMM expanded its coverage all around Turkey through its Provincial Directorates (PDMMs). All these processes have been supported by the respective UN Agencies from the beginning by providing trainings and contributing to capacity development of staff.

A resettlement referral system for Syrian refugees was established where the Turkish migration authorities (DGMM) send lists of referrals collected across the country, to UNHCR for assessment of the cases for potential resettlement. These lists are identified by the local provincial authorities since early 2015 and during the verification exercise which was launched in late 2016.


  • European Commission
    This was created and maintained with the financial support of the European Union. Its contents are the sole responsibility of and do not necessarily reflect the views of the European Union.
  • German Humanitarian Assistance