CRRF - UNHCR

Launch of the permanent water treatment plant in Mahama Refugee Camp

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Country or region: Rwanda
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 3
Actors: International organizations, Non-governmental organizations
CRRF Objectives: Objective 2, Objective 4

Water treatment plant project in Mahama, Rwanda, supported over the past three years by UNCHR, UNICEF, MIDIMAR, UNHCR, Oxfam, and DFID was recently completed. For more information, please access the links below:

  • Mahama: Burundian refugees get a New Permanent Water Treatment Plant (UNHCR website, published on 02/12/2016): here 
  • UNICEF joins MIDIMAR, UNHCR, Oxfam, and DFID to inaugurate the new permanent water treatment plant at Mahama Camp (UNICEF Rwanda, published on 30/11/2016): here

Supporting host communities through collaborative partnerships and the increased uptake of referral pathways among people seeking protection: An example from Uganda

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Country or region: Uganda
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 3, Pillar 4
Actors: Faith-based organizations
CRRF Objectives: Objective 1, Objective 2

This case study is part of a collaborative project carried out by Joint Learning Initiative and UNHCR, which aims to generate locally grounded evidence and identify examples of good practices of local faith community-led responses to refugees across 6 countries: Honduras, Mexico, Uganda, Germany, Bangladesh, and Lebanon.

For more information please contact: olivia@jliflc.com

Building dignified reception conditions and local community resilience: An example from Mexico

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Country or region: Mexico
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 1, Pillar 2, Pillar 3
Actors: Faith-based organizations
CRRF Objectives: Objective 2, Objective 3

This case study is part of a collaborative project carried out by Joint Learning Initiative and UNHCR, which aims to generate locally grounded evidence and identify examples of good practices of local faith community-led responses to refugees across 6 countries: Honduras, Mexico, Uganda, Germany, Bangladesh, and Lebanon. Thirty-five interviews and one focus group with a total of 46 participants were conducted for this case study in order to gain a deeper understanding of how the La 72 migrant shelter operates in assisting displaced populations and supporting the local community.

For more information please contact: olivia@jliflc.com

 

Faith-sensitive innovation to build integrated communities: An example from Lebanon

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Country or region: Lebanon
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 3
Actors: Faith-based organizations
CRRF Objectives: Objective 2

This case study is part of a collaborative project carried out by Joint Learning Initiative and UNHCR, which aims to generate locally grounded evidence and identify examples of good practices of local faith community-led responses to refugees across 6 countries: Honduras, Mexico, Uganda, Germany, Bangladesh, and Lebanon. Thirty-five interviews and one focus group among a total of 46 participants were conducted for this case study.

For more information please contact: olivia@jliflc.com

Promoting long-term integration and self-reliance through education and training: An example from Honduras

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Country or region: Honduras
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 2, Pillar 3, Pillar 4
Actors: Faith-based organizations
CRRF Objectives: Objective 1, Objective 2, Objective 4

This case study is part of a collaborative project carried out by Joint Learning Initiative and UNHCR, which aims to generate locally grounded evidence and identify examples of good practices of local faith community-led responses to refugees across 6 countries: Honduras, Mexico, Uganda, Germany, Bangladesh, and Lebanon.

For more information please contact: olivia@jliflc.com

Supporting the immediate and ongoing needs of displaced people from diverse religious traditions: An example from Germany

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Country or region: Germany
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 3, Pillar 4
Actors: Faith-based organizations
CRRF Objectives: Objective 1, Objective 2

This case study is part of a collaborative project carried out by Joint Learning Initiative and UNHCR, which aims to generate locally grounded evidence and identify examples of good practices of local faith community-led responses to refugees across 6 countries: Honduras, Mexico, Uganda, Germany, Bangladesh, and Lebanon.

For more information please contact: olivia@jliflc.com

Assisting asylum-seeker minors with shelter and education in France

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Country or region: France
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 2, Pillar 3, Pillar 4
Actors: Faith-based organizations, Host communities
CRRF Objectives: Objective 1, Objective 2

Diverse churches are working together in Lille, France, to help minors in the asylum seeker population by providing them with shelter and education. The work began in 2013 when churches began hosting up to 50 minors between 15‐17 years old who had no shelter.

Background: 

There are about 200 asylum seeker minors on the streets of Lille, of which about 10% are girls. The minors are unassisted for 6 months or more as they wait on the government’s decision to be declared/accepted as minors. They are not given access to basic social services during this waiting period.

The diverse group of churches formed the Centre of Reconciliation which focuses its efforts on housing, administrative assistance, and schooling. In 2018, 85 minors were hosted by 200 families. These are organized into sectors shown by the pins (see attachment). Another 30 youth are hosted by twenty various churches and parishes on a rotation basis. This takes a lot of organization to make the arrangements, keep up with the changes and organize volunteers. A farmhouse is a new location that will soon begin hosting 15 youth. It will have a small support team living on the premises to assist.

In 2018, the Centre helped find places for 90 youth in 40 local schools in the Lille area. 30 more youth could be enrolled, but they don’t have the required housing for them. In addition to this, the Centre has begun the “School without Borders” to provide education for those who can’t go to school. 60 youth attend courses in French, math, history, geography and computer information. Courses are taught by 20 different volunteer teachers. The Centre is paying the related monthly transportation costs of about 60 youth in order for them to access and receive these services.

Read more about the Centre of Reconciliation in the attached document in French. 

Livelihood improvement for refugees and host-communities in Uganda (JICA)

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Country or region: Uganda, East and Horn of Africa
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 3, Pillar 4
Actors: Host communities, Development actors, Governments, Persons of concern, United Nations agencies
CRRF Objectives: Objective 2

In Uganda, under the generous policy of the government, refugees have access to land and livelihood activities. Refugee-hosting area in Uganda has a preferable condition for agriculture (rich
rainfall and fertile land). Refugees are under good external conditions. Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industries and Fisheries (MAAIF), and National Agriculture Research Organization (NARO) have implemented technical cooperation projects with JICA to aim at improving farmers’ income through increasing rice production since 2011. Originally, the primary target of technical transfer is Ugandan farmers, but refugees also are included in a target in the resettlement area to achieve inclusive strategy since 2014. UNHCR and WFP also provide support for training in resettlement as well as JICA.

Training provides through cascade system thus refugees and farmers who participated ToT training are expected to share the knowledge with others in their community. After training, participants back with basic knowledge and seeds for multiplication and subsequently field expansion with other community members. Through this technical and material support, the livelihood situation of refugees and farmers in host communities has been upgraded. Successful refugees and farmers have increased their income dramatically through rice production business which attracts more refugees and farmers to engage in. By providing opportunities of rice production training to refugees and host community farmers, seamless support on livelihood is secured and resilience and self-reliance among them can be enhanced in the longer term.

This kind of intervention is scalable and replicable as long as government policy allows refugees to access the land. In this sense, the refugees can also go back with the new skills acquired on how to grow rice in their country. This can also improve economic and food security when they eventually return to their countries hence support conditions in countries of origin.

Support host-community and refugees through enhancing the capacity of local government (JICA)

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Country or region: Uganda, East and Horn of Africa
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 3
Actors: Governments, Host communities, Development actors, Local goverments, Persons of concern
CRRF Objectives: Objective 1, Objective 2

In Uganda, social services are provided through the decentralized government system. The government of Uganda adopts inclusive refugee response strategy, whereby the capacity of local government (LG) has direct impacts on refugees as well as on nationals. Project for Capacity Development of Local Government for Strengthening Community Resilience in Acholi and West Nile
Sub-Regions in the Republic of Uganda (WA-CAP) aims at strengthening the capacity of local governments in the areas of development planning and implementation of community-based
development programmes, thereby contributing to strengthening the resilience of the communities in the region.

Taking advantage of its unique positioning both in terms of its programme focus and geographical areas of activity, the Project is exploring the possibility of supporting district capacity to plan and implement integrated service delivery and development interventions in refugee-hosting districts in West-Nile. For example, simple tools to conduct planning activities were introduced to the District and Sub-Counties where they can easily identify the needs on the ground based on evidence, and prioritize them in a transparent manner so the allocated budget can be utilized in the most needed areas.

Moreover, the local governments are expected to give feedback of the results, thus enhancing the relationship and trust between the community and the local government. For the aspect of
enhancing capacity on implementation of the local government, community development projects have been implemented in refugee-hosting districts so that communities affected by refugee influx are empowered to be resilient.

The Project partners with central Ministry of Local Government, Office of the Prime Minister and the National Planning Authority, but also work directly with LGs on a day-to-day basis. The project has therefore developed a very strong interface with LG officials and has fully been informed of the challenges/opportunities faced by LGs in terms of providing integrated services and more recently of introducing integrated planning with refugee impact duly factored in. The Project has also contributed to strengthening the relationship and information sharing between the central government and LGs so that the policy at the central level is better informed of the actual situation on the ground. This experience culminated to emphasize the important the role of local government at Uganda Solidarity Summit held in June 2017.

Comprehensive needs assessment survey for refugees and host communities (JICA)

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Country or region: East and Horn of Africa, Uganda
CRRF Pillar: Pillar 3
Actors: Development actors, Governments, Local goverments
CRRF Objectives: Objective 1

In Uganda, refugees can receive the same social services as the nationals. And it is clearly mentioned in National Development Plan to include refugee into a government plan. However, there
are big information gaps in the planning process of government. For instance, information on water facility is scattered out among development and humanitarian actors even though local government needs to have all related information as the organization responsible. And after the large influx of South Sudanese refugees in the West-Nile sub-region, many refugees are now accessing the social infrastructures in the host communities, overstretching the existing infrastructure. Therefore a holistic assessment which covers host communities and resettlements is necessary to fill information gaps and to achieve “Integrated Planning” for both the nationals and refugees.

the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and Uganda government launched an urgent survey to identify the gap between existing capacity and needs in the refugee-hosting area in 2017. This survey integrated needs, data and statistics of infrastructure for social service both in refugee settlement and outside, considering impact caused by refugee influx as well as local development. GIS integrated map to cover aforementioned contents was produced for the first time in Uganda and shared with all related stakeholders in development and humanitarians, namely ministries, local government, donors, UN organizations, and civil societies like community leaders and NGOs. The list of priority needs based on sectorial analysis can be utilized by stakeholders and donors to understand the gaps/needs and formulate new projects. Besides, the GIS map can be utilized as a platform for further communication among stakeholders.

The process of the survey itself provides opportunities to exchange opinions among government stakeholders both humanitarian and development, promotes collaboration among donor partners,
and outcome projects will contribute to easing the burden on host communities and settlements in the Refugee Hosting Area. Through utilization of the survey result, collaboration among stakeholders was prompted and once social infrastructure to be realized, both refugees and host communities will be benefitted.


  • European Commission
    This was created and maintained with the financial support of the European Union. Its contents are the sole responsibility of and do not necessarily reflect the views of the European Union.
  • German Humanitarian Assistance